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Tiramisù has quite an erotic origin.

In Did You Know? by Lindsay Gabbard2 Comments

 

The word Tiramisù literally translates to “pick me up” (tira-mi-sù), derived from the Treviso dialect “tireme su” due to 2 of its caffeinated ingredients - espresso and cocoa.  Origins are highly debated and a bit mysterious for this heavenly aphrodisiac, but legend has it that it was actually first served in brothels in Treviso as a means to reinvigorate prostitutes and clients to keep the money flowing.

Strangely, this recipe only found its way into cookbooks only near the 1980s, but has become synonymous with the Italian cuisine.


Why isn't Tiramisù ever as good back home?


Have you wondered why this delectable dessert does not always live up to being quite so satiating back home? Our chef Tommy explained that most of the mascarpone cheese has much less fat content in North America - sometimes only 30% fat, compared to the 60% fat content we use in Rimessa Roscioli, which is also from an artisan producer.

When paired with the right wine (we often use a Moscato d'Asti from Fabio Perrone) I watch our clients escape into a new realm where this ambrosial combination sometimes leaves adults saying "I don't know why kids do drugs - they could just eat tiramisu and drink moscato."

By the way, we also never add liquor which can make the dish feel a bit heavy for its delicate nature, but you often find it with Marsala or Madeira, but even rum or amaretto are sometimes added.

Watch our chef prepare the recipe and spice up your next romantic night by serving this sumptuous dessert.


 

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Wines from North America can contain GMO yeasts.

In Did You Know? by Lindsay GabbardLeave a Comment

 
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Fundamentally and ethically, it seems quite unfair that the consumer is the one who gets the short end of the stick with regards to being informed about the contents of their wine, especially in North America where laws for keeping potentially harmful ingredients out of this beverage tend to be less stringent.


GMO yeasts meet with legal approval in North America


If you're concerned with GMOs in the products you are consuming you may need to be careful with which wine you are drinking.

Back in 2014, GMO yeast ML01 (a yeast which helps large corporations to speed up the fermentation process) for the first time was approved and added into wine in North America where GMO's are unregulated.  The EU has banned this practice, as wine yeasts are unstable and genetically altering them can lead to unforeseen toxicity in the final product.  Even though the FDA has declared it GRAS (generally regarded as safe), no independent studies have been conducted outside of the company who developed it for further safety assurance.

Expounding on this issue is that yeasts are wild and ambient and can easily cause unsolicited contamination in neighboring vineyards who are vehemently against their use. This is a risky practice and one that can have devastating effects, similar to the way that the use of Roundup has contaminated unsuspecting neighbors working in the agricultural sector.

How do you know if your wine contains GMO yeasts? Your best bet is to buy wines outside of North America, buy organic wines (some will even have the Non-GMO Verified certification) or solicit the winemaker and hope they are honest with you.

 

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Natural Winemakers think differently about Sulfites.

In Did You Know? by Lindsay GabbardLeave a Comment

 
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Sulfites are nothing new in wines. In fact, they are present in ALL wines at some level, usually under 25 ppm, due to being a natural byproduct of fermentation. When speaking about added sulfites, some believe that sulfites were first discovered to help preserve wines as far back as Greek Antiquity or the Roman Empire, although the jury is still out on this.

We do know that it is first well documented in the 1487 German Royal Decree, where it was permitted to burn sulfur-soaked wood chips to disinfect barrels and preserve wines.  But, the amount that ended up in wines was probably much lower than what we see today in many industrial and conventional wines, where the limits can push 200-300ppm.

If you wish to drink wines with lower levels of sulfites, look for natural wines where the winemaker often follows a philosophy of 'nothing added, nothing taken away', organic wines (but beware there will still be sulfites and possibly other additives) or wines from smaller producers, especially from the Old World, as they don't worry about killing microbial activity to control the flavors in the same way that a brand name must do to achieve the consistency in flavors for their sometimes million plus bottles.

The jury is also still out on whether sulfites are responsible for hangovers (there are also a slew of other strange additives and natural histamines which can cause problems).  But if I had a nickel for every time someone said "I don't get hangovers drinking Italian wine", I'd be rich.  So maybe the proof is in the pudding...or the Italian and natural wine.

If you are interested in wines like this, you may enjoy our Italian wine club. All the wines included have minimal or no added sulfites.

 

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There are more than 1,800 different registered grape varietals in Italy.

In Did You Know? by Lindsay GabbardLeave a Comment

 
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Ones like Corinto Nero, Pelaverga, Schioppettino, Bombino Bianco, Cesanese - which give life to some of the most wild and incredible flavors (anyone who's been to a Rimessa Roscioli wine tasting can remember the vivid Proust-like madeleine memories that surface from the spicy and mesmerizing Schioppettino we serve with dinner).

But the scary reality is that most people only know a handful of different grapes - Cabernet, Merlot, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, Syrah, and the other ones used to categorize supermarket shelves.  It seems that winemakers these days just produce wines that will fit into those categorized shelves as though any other grape would be lost without a home, and ultimately never sell.

Having moved to Italy and discovered a universe of new grape varietals, most which are territorially linked to a place after hundreds or thousands of years of natural selection, I now refer to my home country the USA as "grape-ist" - since about 82% of the wine comes from less than 10 grape varietals.


Why does this happen?


Well, for the obvious modern day reasons, of course - simplicity makes things easier to understand, more familiar, and therefore ultimately easier to sell.  I lived in Santa Barbara and know the not-so-pretty costs of CA living, so risk-taking is not something newer winemakers are often willing or able to doWine takes a long time to develop and understand and unfortunately that is just not on our side anymore.

To discover the universe of grape varietals in Italy and get lost in the wild world of wine, consider joining the Roscioli Wine Club!

 

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Winemaking in Italy dates back to 4,000 BC.

In Did You Know? by Lindsay GabbardLeave a Comment

 
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Italy didn't invent wine by the way.  So who did, you might ask.  Well, it has been widely accepted that wine originated in the country of Georgia, some 6,000 - 8,000 years ago.

Until recently, the oldest traces of winemaking in Italy were assumed to date to 3,000 years ago on the island of Sardinia, but new research has discovered a 6,000 year old copper container with traces of tartaric acid and sodium salt which are present in grapes and winemaking.


New World Wine


When we speak about New World wine (ie. Australia, USA, South America), these are countries that are still in their infancy having been making wine for just 50-200 years on average. This means when we speak about Old World wine vs. New World wine, there is a staggering philosophical gap on what "wine" even means. 


Old World Wine


Generally speaking, the Old World was making wine for thousands of years, in a way we might call organic and natural by today's standards, without the existence of corporations, technology, chemicals, and marketing and saw no reason to fix what wasn't broken.

Whereas, I'll reiterate, generally speaking, the New World has been making wine in an era where science trumps tradition, where the wildness of wine should be controlled for optimum results with new found chemicals, treatments, machines, and selected yeasts to build up a flavor profile which will appeal to the masses, essentially fitting into the algorithm that will yield high ratings from the often corrupted wine journalists and be sure it can be easily marketed and sold.

The definition of wine states that it is an alcoholic beverage made from fermented grape juice.  That may have been at one time been the beautiful simplicity of the beverage, but sadly it has become one of the most adulterated beverages and that definition has become one of the most misleading statements for the consumer.

 

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Wine and Populism: No Barrier to Entry

In An American in Rome, Articles by Christopher MacleanLeave a Comment

 

Populism is all around us these days. Expertise is out of fashion. Your friend who manages a small business is just as able to balance the national budget as any so-called expert economist. And your palate is just as good as the palate of any so-called wine expert.

At first glance, all this populism is tough for me to swallow. Most of us can point to areas in which we have some expertise. I was in the U.S. Air Force for 20 years. As a result, people assume I know a thing or two about military aircraft. If only that were true! (Looking back, maybe I should have spent fewer work hours reading about wine.)

But there were times I felt like an expert. As a military diplomat, or Attache, in Italy, I once advised a high-level visiting U.S. official on the protocols of sprinkling cheese on pasta. Before I intervened, this guy was about to put grated parmesan on spaghetti with clams. I doubt he’d ever admit it, but somewhere deep inside, he knows I saved him from all sorts of future diplomatic embarrassment.

So, I hope we can all agree that expertise can be a good thing. In the wine world, however, there are many reasons to doubt the so-called experts.

First, let’s talk about sommeliers. Some are great of course. But generally speaking, I’m skeptical when someone boasts about being a sommelier. The most capable sommeliers I know readily admit it’s quite possible to learn just as much about wine on your own. And more than a few have resolutely discouraged me from enrolling in a sommelier course.

It’s also far too common to find sommelier school graduates who don’t seem to know much about the world of wine. Just go to any big tasting event and ask the folks in the funny costumes if the wine they are pouring was made in a traditional or modern style—or perhaps somewhere in between. In my experience, the reply is usually a blank stare.

Admittedly, the example of Alessandro Pepe (Rimessa Roscioli founder and sommelier extraordinaire) doesn’t help the case I’ve built against sommeliers. More than I’d like to admit, he gives the profession a good name. Then again, I knew Alessandro for at least two years before he revealed he was a certified sommelier.


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What about the famous experts who write wine tasting notes? To be diplomatic, I’m not a big fan.

While wine reviews can be valuable to drinkers who don’t have the time to research or taste before buying, there are better ways to select bottles. I advise friends to find a decent wine store, strike up a conversation with one of the employees—ideally the main buyer—and ask for his/her favorite pizza wine for under $20. If it doesn’t work out after two attempts, try another store.

I could go on all day about my issues with wine reviews but probably my biggest beef is that they often directly contradict other expert notes on the very same wine. I can understand disagreement over a score, or whether a wine should be cellared for 5 or 8 years. But I think we should expect some degree of critical consistency over whether a wine if full-bodied, or if it shows a lot of oak, or when it has that cat pee smell going on.


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Speaking of cat urine, a few years back I took a wine course in which an expert instructor droned on for five minutes about how that cat pee aroma (usually found in Sauvignon Blanc) is actually the distinctive scent of a freshly cut Sicilian orange stem. As I listened, I couldn’t stop thinking that this was exactly the kind of pointless, insistent drivel that makes people hate wine.

So I raised my hand: “I grew up in a house full of cats and dogs, and I’m pretty sure this wine smells a lot like the cat’s piss.” The expert instructor was none too pleased. “Keep smelling,” he replied.

If someone wants to call cat pee an orange stem, by all means, be my guest. C'est la vie. But is it worth getting all worked up over? I say no.

I often wonder why wine people feel compelled to parse out every perceived flavor and aromatic nuance they sense. One reason is that we seek wine validation. We want others to agree with what we smell and taste in the glass. It’s an understandable impulse, but it doesn’t make much sense to insist on our judgements. After all, every palate is different. Does it really matter if you perceive white peach when I’m getting a regular peach?

Far too many times, I’ve looked up a wine and noticed that reviewer X gets blueberries on the nose whereas expert Y convincingly argues for mulberry notes. I suppose that’s mildly interesting. I, the reader, can sample the wine in question to see who I agree with, and where I land on this particular blueberry-mulberry spectrum.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t stop there. It never does. Reviewer X also insists that there are notes of figs and a very dark variety of Ecuadorian chocolate. Meanwhile, expert Y will have you believe what we’re really dealing with is a note of southern Venezuelan dark chocolate.

At this point, it’s just not useful or fun any more. Unless you start drinking very fast.

Wait, did I just argue that we should make wine fun again? I guess that confirms I’m a wine populist. But I’m not happy about it.

 
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Barolo according to Claudio Viberti

In Winemakers & Vineyards by Chris FoleyLeave a Comment

 

La storia della cantina Viberti Giovanni comincia quando il Cavalier Antonio Viberti acquista la Locanda del Buon Padre. Correva l’anno 1923 quando Antonio cominciò a produrre, nello scantinato del Buon Padre, il vino per gli ospiti della sua Locanda. All’epoca, il Dolcetto, il Barbera e il Nebbiolo erano le 3 uve vinificate in purezza dal Cavaliere e la vendita dei vini avveniva quasi esclusivamente all’interno del Buon Padre. Durante un recente viaggio di ricerca per il Roscioli Wine Club, abbiamo visitato Claudio Viberti nella sua vigna e gli abbiamo chiesto di descriverci i suoi metodi e i suoi pensieri sul Barolo.

The story of the Viberti Giovanni winery begins when Cavalier Antonio Viberti buys the Locanda del Buon Padre. It was the year 1923 when Antonio began to produce wine for the guests of his locanda (B&B) in the basement of the Buon Padre.

On a recent scouting trip for the Roscioli Wine Club we visited Claudio Viberti at his vineyard, and asked him to describe to us his methods and his thoughts on Barolo.

 
 

Castiglione Falletto, Serralunga, Barolo, and La Morra.

South is there, there's always this gentle wind that comes from there and this wind protect from peronospera (downy Mildew, a fungus of the vines) but it brings the oidium (podwery mildew), that in locale dialect is called marin (from marine, the sea) so a disease brought by the sea wind you can even feel it now. Here the air is rarely still. This land was bought by my grandfather in 1946, just after WWII. My father and my grandfather used to make wine, but really few bottles most of it was sold as bulk wine or they sold the grape directly.

I started in 2002, my historical vintage and from 2002 all production is bottled all lands are from this village, Castiglione (Barolo) here Rocche (di Castiglione) and up there another piece of Castiglione and a small piece of Mariondino which is another Cru, and I also have a part of Bricco Boschis that is 1.5km from here. All is in the Village of Castiglione Falletto when the summer is so hot like now we keep the high grass to keep the soil humid temperatures are really high this year (2019).

There are producers that let the grass grow and others that not. I do a bit but surely I don't put any herbicide. Twice a year I pass with a trimmer. It is a classic Guyot, 1 mt of distance like we used to do once upon a time - now they usualy do 80 cm. Here at Rocche the soil is sandy, clear, calcareous. there's also sand so calcareous soils that make the wines here typical. Here the wines are elegant and fragrant. Where you have those light soils wines are fragrant. Less colour, less structure, but really elegant instead.

Rocche di Castiglione is considered one of the 3 premier Cru of Barolo with Brunate and Cerequio, becuase wines from Rocche are so typical and easy to recognize in a blind taste.

So I have these two Cru, Rocche and Bricco Boschis, 1.5km of distance but they are totally different because exposure is different. Here is South East... once was the best position. But now with global warming maybe not... it take the sun of the morning...

In fact we don't need to treat the vines a lot here because the morning wind dries the plants and prevent from diseases.

While Bricco Boschis is a different hill and side. It's West. It has the afternoon sun, much more clay there, so with a stronger tannin (while here tannins are softer and sweeter).

Here wines are ready to drink earlier comparing to Bricco Boschis, while there wines have more structure but less elegance. You can't have everything!

That one is the castle of Castiglione. This is the soil of Rocche, light...

Some stones too, sandstones. The last vineyard there on the ridge that's the central area of Rocche, you can easily find tuff there. When langhe were elected UNESCO heritage here in this area you can't build anything so I have some problems of space here.

This is all French oak. I think French oak is a bit more elegant than Slavonian. I buy new oak. The first passage, I keep the wine in new oak for only 3 months and then you change wine (so that it doesn't have oak flavours).

 

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The 10 Best Italian Wines of our Life – According to Lindsay and Alessandro

In Articles by Lindsay GabbardLeave a Comment

 

First of all, let me say that a wine in itself is nothing without context and on the other hand a wine can be everything thanks to the context. The stage, where you are and above all, who you are with.  Being expensive, rated with 100 points, even being on a 'Top' list won't always make it a great or memorable wine.


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In this ranking I will only mention the 5 best Italian Wines I have drunk in the last 4 years, because four years ago I completely changed my perspective on drinking.

Each bottle has taken on a different meaning since August 28, 2015. It was no longer the wine itself but the wine because and above all, with whom.  These may not be the 10 Best Italian Wines in existence but they have made impressions on us in many ways despite their price, their top rank.


Alessandro's Selections:

 
 

Vino da Rimessa, Marabino

October 2017


Do you remember? We were at Rimessa, I believe one day in October it finally arrived. That feeling of uncertainty. You are afraid that you will not like it, that you will not love it even if it is your child. Then we tasted it together. An unconditional love - between us, and that bottle.
 
 

Vin Santo La Sorpresa, Pacina

July 2018



Do you remember? We were at Rimessa, I believe one day in October it finally arrived. That feeling of uncertainty. You are afraid that you will not like it, that you will not love it even if it is your child. Then we tasted it together. An unconditional love - between us, and that bottle.
 
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I had made up my mind to reach Pacina, in the heart of Tuscany, from Siena by foot and for once I did it. You arrived a little later in the car. There was a table of chefs and sommeliers from Japan to America and us in the middle, with Giovanna and Stefano. At the end comes a fior di latte ice cream with a small glass of Vin Santo. I know only a sweeter and more sensual thing than that combination, that is you.
 
 

Barolo Rocche dell'Annunziata 2012, Accomasso

July 11, 2019


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A few days ago in Piedmont in search of the many souls of nebbiolo from Valtellina, to Gattinara, down to Barolo and Barbaresco, we stumble across it. An impromptu lunch. Not even on the wine list but my first bottle of Accomasso Barolo from the legendary producer in La Morra who we will soon meet at the end of one of the most beautiful wine tours ever made in Langa. Your smile and that bottle. This is enough for me as a souvenir.
 
 

Malvasia delle Lipari Chianu Cruci, Caravaglio

June 2018


Every time at the end of one of our wine tours I say: this one was the most beautiful. But then another comes. But those days in the Aeolian Islands, we ended up in the vineyards of Caravaglio. We tasted that Chianu Cruci in preview. A love at first sight, all Mediterranean, savory and sweet. Without discussions or second thoughts, like the first time I saw you.
 
 

Etna Rosso Don Pippinu, Scirto

July 2017


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Giuseppe and Valeria, you and I, in a farmhouse in a torrid Sicilian July, to drink a red wine from Etna that tasted of lava, of fire. It was the first real Etna I had ever tasted. It was us four inside to converse, drink and eat salami - a simple and very ancient ritual, vital, Dionysian. Do you remember? Do you remember the smells, the tastes, the wild peaches, the centuries-old vines? The sincerity of the whole? It seemed true, it was true. It can still be.
 
 

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Coming from Santa Barbara, frequenting the famous Les Marchands wine bar based on Old World selections, and working in a local wine bar there with international wines, I thought I had a pretty decent selection of Italian wines available abroad.  That was until I tasted wines in Italy and at Rimessa Roscioli like these.  These are wines that you could never find abroad and that have shocked my taste buds.  More importantly, I've been the luckiest woman in Italy to be tasting these alongside Alessandro, or for starters they would have never been as memorable, nor would I have ever had access to them.


Lindsay's Selections:

 
 

Schioppettino, Bressan

August 28, 2015


This red wine from Friuli Venezia Giulia, and one particular man I know, are so infinitely unique and have a complexity that constantly evolve, bringing awe and curiosity to your life. For our clients, this wine is the memories of sweet pine at Christmas time, walking through the fragrant air of a Moroccan spice market, even an old gothic church laced with smells of frankincense and myrrh, old books and antiques of grandma's house. For me, it enlivens all the spicy, sweet and complex memories from that moment forward that changed my life the way the madeleine in the tea invoked Proust's.
 
 

Brunello di Montalcino Riserva 1997, Biondi-Santi

July 24, 2018


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I was the luckiest person 3 times on this date. One to be traveling with my love in those picturesque postcard hills of Tuscany. Two, to have my brother and his family visiting me and a little slice of home to show off my fantasy life to. And three, to be on a private tour, in cellars not open to the public of the legendary Biondi-Santi, arranged by none other than the best organizer in the world. 21 years old, still young and vibrant, yet growing softer and more complex each day - the way I hope we will be in 2040 (and the Rosso di Montalcino 2015 tasted a year later was equally astonishing).
 
 

Barolo 'Parafada' 2013, Palladino

August 28, 2015



For a wine known as the King of Wines which comes with the notion that it'll be brooding, tannic and 'masculine', this wine will remind you that wine, like people and women, can be anything and do not have to follow stereotypes. The elegance of this wine is Grace Kelly, Audrey Hepburn - feminine, timeless, floral, beautiful and one that defies constructs. A reminder that life is boundless and beautiful, as he shows me everyday.
 
 

Sweet Claire, Lieselehof

June 2019


I've never been higher in my life, in any sense. Drinking a wine from one of the highest vineyards in the Dolomites, reminiscing of paragliding over the jagged, majestic mountains, high on the discovery and travel we get to do together, re-falling in love again and again, and with wines too. This one is sweet ambrosial nectar, like those apricots from Pacina and peaches from Scirto, and those sweet memories of a 2001 Chateau d'Yquem, amongst a million others, that we've savored together.
 
 

Gattinara 1955, Berteletti Castello di Lozzolo

November 19, 2017


Thank you to Gaetano Saccoccio, it's the oldest nebbiolo wine I've drank and I still can taste it like it was yesterday. 15 of us were all fortunate to share in this mystic experience, as there is no better philosophy in life than 'sharing is caring'. The perfect recipe for the ability to age well - not too much sun and fruit, a bit of acidity and some tannins to give balance to the wine, and some tender love and care (and by the way, it works for relationships too). What joy it will be to become as complex as this wine in time...
 
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Roscioli Favorites – Premium 6 pack

In Articles by Lindsay GabbardLeave a Comment

 

PROSECCO DI VALDOBBIADENE SUR LIE, CASA COSTE PIENE


Grape: Glera
Region: Valdobbiadene (Veneto)
Pairings: a perfect aperitive, meaning pairs with nearly anything
Drink by: best now, up to 2020
Notes: natural and spontaneous secondary fermentation in the bottle, 250-400m above sea level in hilly and clay terrain, no pesticides or herbicides used, maximum respect for land and tradition.
Description:  My first thoughts upon reaching the massive Prosecco zone stretching across the Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia: what a sad place to make wine? Even the vineyards look despondent and dismal. This pancake flat, cornfield laden area with vineyards butted up beside them was like a somber and depressing depiction from David Foster Wallace's Illinois State Fair essay about the Midwest.

But then, we reached this special little area, the Valdobbiadene hills, where again the stereotypical panoramas of Italian hills pervade.  You'll find Loris Follador there.  From his character, he seems to me like the last guy that would be making an overproduced, cheesy and overly sweet beverage (aka 99% of Prosecco), and he's not.  One of the very few, he's making his in the traditional style on the lees with the fermentation happening in the bottle with no disgorgement, and from vines that are up to 100 years old.

Sure, it's not a Krug Clos du Mesnil but it's highly quaffable, refreshing and certainly not your typical Prosecco which might be confused with the wines of Asti.  Pair it with friends, holidays or New Year's Eve!


 
 

TIMORASSO ' IL MONTINO' 2015, LA COLOMBERA



Grape: 100% Timorasso
Region:  Colli Tortonesi (Piemonte)
Pairings:  white meat like chicken, fish, risotto, or pairs well as an aperitivo
Drink by: now, or by 2024
Notes: organic farming (non-certified), most prized wine they make, stainless and bottle aging, 
Description:  Do you know those kind of people who are always smiling, who seem happy in a contagious way? In Italian, we say solare, from sole - sun, sunny. Not in a goofy or hypocritical way but really happy in their smile, their eyes.  My girlfriend is like this. I told her yesterday. We met at my tasting 3 years ago and I was literally shocked by her simple smile, not fake, not nervous, but natural - so Californian I would say (actually Santa Barbara). It's the same as some wines which make you feel happy from the very first sip. Beyond the alcohol content, I’m talking about wines that are able to be deep and easy drinking, complex and soft at the same time.
And when you meet Elisa, from la Colombera, it's kind of the same experience. As though you knew her for a long time. The happy and welcoming sister you never had. No matter the climate, she smiles because there’s nothing too serious about wine even if her wine is seriously a masterpiece.  This wine is a perfect balance of minerality and fruit with light floral notes.


 
 

PINTO NERO XX 2016, ANSITZ-DORNACH



Grape: 100% Pinot Nero (Pinot Noir)
Region: Trentino Alto Adige 
Pairings:  meat dishes, or dishes made with mushrooms and speck, lamb, strong gamey dishes and venison
Drink by: now until 2028
Notes: certified organic, biodynamic, only indigenous yeasts, delicate and longer maceration, 22 months in French oak, maximum respect for the land
Description: 'I don't think we're in Kansas anymore'...was basically how I felt in this area as German was the main language yet we are in Italy.  It's a cultural mish-mosh having traded hands some 15+ times in a few hundred years.  Brush up on your German or Ladin, not your Italian, if you plan to visit.  You'll find street signs in German first and you'll be eating kraut, schnitzel and strudel (from the abundant local apple tradition on the Adige valley floor).

'I have done away with the superfluous, in every sense of my life', says Patrick.  And what was left is what you see today.  A biodynamic/organic vineyard, a full ecosystem from Noah's arc, 3 dogs, and family more or less remains.

Patrick takes biodynamic wine to a new level.  For him, it' not just a style of winemaking where he buys the necessary preparations (he makes them himself) to put the certification on his bottle, but a way to know himself.  Every part of what he works with builds a deeper understanding and appreciation of who he is.  Working with plants, vines and a bountiful garden. Working with cows, sheep, chickens, breeding them, connecting with them, and ultimately slaughtering them.  All these layers help him to understand what it is to be human and to better be intimate with his life, purpose and nature.


 
 

BRUNELLO DI MONTALCINO 2013, LE REGNAIE



Grape:  100% Sangiovese Grosso
Region: Montalcino (Tuscany)
Pairings:  savory dishes like stews, bone steak, game, roasted and grilled lamb, good quality salami and hams, aged cheeses
Drink bynow until 2030, patience pays off 
Notes: highest vines in Montalcino, certified organic farming, cement casks, no added yeast, 3 week maceration, 25hl Slavonian oak for 3 years, 26 avg. age vines
Description:  Simply said, one of the best Brunello di Montalcino made and enjoyed by everyone we pour it for.

Sadly, it's almost an anomaly to find a 'good' Brunello (don't believe us? Take it from Adamo from Contucci).  Most is coming from a forested area or the valley floor which is not ideal, nor was never included in the original 76 hectares (current size is some 2400+ hectares) in 1963.  And whether or not you believe in the idea of global warming, being at the highest point of Montalcino where it's cooler helps in these warm years where the valley floor suffers.  Maybe I'm partial to his wines since he has an American wife, or maybe it's just that everything tastes great when you're perched up on a hill with breathtaking panoramas and sipping 'under the Tuscan sun'... Or maybe it's Ricardo's love for Burgundy which inspires his style - elegant, powerful, complex and persistent on the palate, maybe not over-oaking his wines like most are to cover over bad wine, or maybe his various and complex terroirs (now even including a vineyard on the famous Montosoli cru) are what make his wines so beautiful but regardless, treat this wine with care and enjoy in a few more years if you can, with a nice t-bone steak or nestled up on a cold winter day by a fireplace with someone you love.


 
 

NERO DI TROIA RISERVA 'ARMENTARIO' 2012, CARPENTIERE



Grape:  100% Nero di Troia
Region: Castel del Monte (Puglia)
Pairings: red meat dishes
Drink by: now until 2021
Notes: indigenous yeasts, manually harvested, fermentation in steel and 24 months aging in large Slavonian oak for 2 years.
Description: Simply said, we make wines based on terroir, not based on market demands, even though the market rewards artificial wines. Tradition, heritage and terroir is what this wine is based on. A family vineyard that he continues to care for, as this land has been around for thousands of years and will be for possibly thousands more, and preserving and maintaining that heritage while he is there is the most important thing. This unique Italian wine could possibly be called feminine on the nose, as it reminded me of roaming through the rose gardens in Rome, smelling all the 1100 varieties of roses planted there. The terroir of this region also gives the wine a unique minerality, and you'll likely pick up the bitter honey aromas as you come back to it. Just like a rose, this wine needs time to open up. Give it some time before you judge it, but I think you will find this to be one of the most unique wines in terms of its aromas and palate. Not just a 'girly' wine...this wine has a nice grip and depth to it as well.

 
 

BAROLO VIGNA LAZZIARASCO 2014, GUIDO PORRO



Grape: 100% Nebbiolo
Region: Serralunga d'Alba, Barolo (Piedmont) cru Lazzarito
Pairings: prime rib, steak, red meat
Drink by: 2030, patience pays off
Notes:  No added yeast, average vine age is 45 years, 15-20 day maceration, 3 years in large Slavonian oak 
Description: How do you describe Guido Porro?  There is nothing wild or out of the norm that he is doing that I can show off to you.  He's not some crazy guy with stories about giving a liter of wine to the cows everyday...   He is a 4th generation winemaker, following the traditions of his family and heritage of the region and somehow that is enough.  He lets the terroir speak in his wines, making his various cru wines in the same way and watching how different they can be based on their exposure and soils.  In a fast-paced world where we often bounce from one shiny thing to the next, the Porro's have stayed put, and this was it often takes for wine regions to develop an important heritage and deeper understanding of their land and region.

This beautiful Italian wine has spicy notes, hints of dried red fruits with notes of vanilla and licorice, and is possibly the bigger wine of the crus they make having more exposure to the sun. 2014 was a challenging year for just about everyone, so be cautious to judge them on a single wine.  This vintage may not have quite the lasting power of others, but Serralunga d'Alba is known for full bodied wines with limestone-clay rich soils which can be held for a few years for more pleasure.

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Roscioli Tasting Notes | 9 | Wine Club 2 Reds

In Wine Club Tasting Notes by Lindsay GabbardLeave a Comment

 

Brunello di Montalcino 2013, Poggiarellino


Grape: Sangiovese Grosso
Region: Montalcino (TOSCANA)
Pairings: Bone steak, game, cured meats, pork, red meat, earthy dishes
Drink by: Now - 2028+
Notes: large Slovenian oak, non-filtered
Video Description: 


 
 

Barbera del Monferrato Rossore 2016, Iuli



Grape: Barbera
Region:  Monferrato (PIEMONTE)
Pairings:  Quite versatile - Duck, game, roasted meats, pasta with meat sauce, medium aged cheeses.
Drink by: Now - 2023
Notes: Organic production, indigenous yeasts no fining or filtration, spontaneous fermentation, no set time but use of oak barrels.


 
 

Corinto Nero 'Nero di Munti' 2018, Caravaglio




Grape: Corinto Nero
Region: Lipari (SICILY)
Pairings: Red meat dishes ideal, a good hamburger.
Drink by: now - 2023 (but wait 6 mos if possible)
Notes: One century year-old un-grafted plants (about half a hectare), and grafted plants, organic farming, no chemicals, 1 year aging in wood and stainless, 2500 bottles produced.
Video Description:


 
 

Primitivo di Manduria 2013, Attanasio



Grape: Primitivo (Zinfandel)
Region: Manduria (PUGLIA)
PairingsPasta dishes, roasted meats, blue or strong cheeses
Drink bynow - 2025 
Notes: 40-50 years old vines, temperature controlled fermentation, 12 months in oak (20% new), long macerations.
Video Description:


 
 

Rosso di Montalcino 'Alberello' 2016, Fonterenza



Grape: Sangiovese Grosso
Region: Montalcino (TOSCANA)
Pairings: Game, cured meats, pork, red meat, earthy dishes with mushrooms,
Drink by:  now - 2025
Notes: Biodynamic farming, no additives, no synthetic chemicals/fertilizers, indigenous yeasts and maceration on the skins for 18 days, 11 months in big oak barrels and 13 in steel vats
Video Description:

 
 

Barolo San Bernardo Riserva 2013, Palladino



Grape: Nebbiolo
Region: Serralunga d'Alba (PIEMONTE)
Pairings: Earthy dishes, truffle risotto, prime rib, brassato, hearty stews, roasted meats, quality aged Parmigiano-reggiano or Comte
Drink by: 2021 - 2035+ (patience pays off)
Notes: 36 months in large oak barrels, open this bottle hours in advance.
Video Description

 
 

How to Use:
De Carlo Torre di Mossa EVOO and Thun honey


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Can't visit Rome?

WE'LL BRING ITALY TO YOU.

Be part of the finest Italian Wine Club and bring Italy to you wherever you are.


Not in Rome?

WE'LL BRING ITALY TO YOU.

Be part of the finest Wine Club in Rome and bring Italy home to you wherever you are.


Roscioli Wine ClubLearn More